NZPPCC - The NZ Primera & Pulsar Car Club

General Forums => Frequently Asked Questions => Topic started by: Gherkin on 22 December, 2015, 09:06:16 PM

Title: Car tuning
Post by: Gherkin on 22 December, 2015, 09:06:16 PM
Hey can anyone point me at the direction for getting my pulsar tuned? Thanks
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: morrisman1 on 22 December, 2015, 11:41:38 PM
Might help to have a bit more information. Do you have an aftermarket ECU, or using a daughterboard? What engine do you have and are there any modifications? Where are you located?
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: mrt on 04 April, 2016, 02:51:49 PM
Im after the same information. Is there someone in the club that can sort out tuning? I too have a N14 pulsar with a few mods and looking at tuning.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 04 April, 2016, 04:18:39 PM
Take it to a performance shop with a dyno, and be prepared to get your wallet out in a big way.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: N14_NEO on 04 April, 2016, 05:26:23 PM
If you're Lance (read: want to do things the hard way whist getting reamed for it), then do this:

Take it to a performance shop with a dyno, and be prepared to get your wallet out in a big way.

Otherwise, I would recommend getting in touch with club member and former president Darryl Stokes (R3SPCT). Darryl has a lot of experience tuning FWD SRs (NA and turbo-charged), and also has the contacts to source the hardware. Check out the following links:

We have run group buys in the past (http://www.primeracarclub.co.nz/forum/index.php?topic=22516.15)

Darryl's thread in regards to his own tuning (and products) (http://www.primeracarclub.co.nz/forum/index.php?topic=15228.0)

Depending on the size of your budget, and how extensive your modifications are, this post in the above thread will be of particular interest to you (http://www.primeracarclub.co.nz/forum/index.php?topic=15228.msg281745#msg281745)

Hope this helps you, mate.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 04 April, 2016, 05:53:15 PM
I would recommend getting in touch with club member and former president Darryl Stokes (R3SPCT). Darryl has a lot of experience tuning FWD SRs (NA and turbo-charged), and also has the contacts to source the hardware. Check out the following links:

Except Darryl doesn't really have time to do other peoples' tuning who are not in Auckland any more, last I checked :P

If you're Lance (read: want to do things the hard way whist getting reamed for it)

Things I have done the easy way:
-Install Link G4 for easy tuning by literally anyone who knows what they are doing
-Take car to exhaust shop to get one piece made from turbo to existing exhaust
-Take car to professional tuning shop to get the job done on a dyno
-Got existing clutch (with no fitment issues) rebuilt rather than buy a new one
-etc.
....Funnily enough, they were the most expensive things :P

Things I have done the hard way:
-Custom engine loom wiring (rather than getting a new loom and modifying slightly to suit). Not really that hard because I find wiring to be the easiest part.
-Buying a wire-in Link instead of the plug n' play. Because wiring is easy, annnnnnnnnnnd..... the wire-ins look cooler (no rice I swear)
-Not be a millionaire, so takes ages to afford stuff
-Not having a house with a garage, so having to drive to my parents' place to work on car
-Owning a 4WD Primera in general
-Break an antique gearbox that you can't get parts for anymore
-etc.

So, Nick, there you go - I'm not completely insane  ;D
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: pTen Developments on 04 April, 2016, 06:32:24 PM
I would recommend getting in touch with club member and former president Darryl Stokes (R3SPCT). Darryl has a lot of experience tuning FWD SRs (NA and turbo-charged), and also has the contacts to source the hardware. Check out the following links:

Except Darryl doesn't really have time to do other peoples' tuning who are not in Auckland any more, last I checked :P


Plenty of Welly people have road tripped up to see him
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 04 April, 2016, 07:07:31 PM
Would have needed car tuned first... Catch-22  ::)
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: jevans on 04 April, 2016, 11:55:53 PM
I would recommend getting in touch with club member and former president Darryl Stokes (R3SPCT). Darryl has a lot of experience tuning FWD SRs (NA and turbo-charged), and also has the contacts to source the hardware. Check out the following links:

Except Darryl doesn't really have time to do other peoples' tuning who are not in Auckland any more, last I checked :P

If you're Lance (read: want to do things the hard way whist getting reamed for it)

Things I have done the easy way:
-Install Link G4 for easy tuning by literally anyone who knows what they are doing
-Take car to exhaust shop to get one piece made from turbo to existing exhaust
-Take car to professional tuning shop to get the job done on a dyno
-Got existing clutch (with no fitment issues) rebuilt rather than buy a new one
-etc.
....Funnily enough, they were the most expensive things :P

Things I have done the hard way:
-Custom engine loom wiring (rather than getting a new loom and modifying slightly to suit). Not really that hard because I find wiring to be the easiest part.
-Buying a wire-in Link instead of the plug n' play. Because wiring is easy, annnnnnnnnnnd..... the wire-ins look cooler (no rice I swear)
-Not be a millionaire, so takes ages to afford stuff
-Not having a house with a garage, so having to drive to my parents' place to work on car
-Owning a 4WD Primera in general
-Break an antique gearbox that you can't get parts for anymore
-etc.

So, Nick, there you go - I'm not completely insane  ;D

I have to almost agree with Lance on the ECU parts, my experiences with my Nismotronic haven't been all that great and at some points it has had me wishing I had chosen a mainstream ECU option; the software is horribly buggy and unstable (for example, I did an upload after the last software update and it corrupted all the data on the ECU and left me stranded on the side of the road), nobody wants to tune it and I seem to get random issues with the tune and software which isn't very reassuring.

But because I'm a student I have no option but to persevere with it.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 05 April, 2016, 09:19:12 AM
I have to almost agree with Lance on the ECU parts, my experiences with my Nismotronic haven't been all that great and at some points it has had me wishing I had chosen a mainstream ECU option; the software is horribly buggy and unstable (for example, I did an upload after the last software update and it corrupted all the data on the ECU and left me stranded on the side of the road), nobody wants to tune it and I seem to get random issues with the tune and software which isn't very reassuring.

But because I'm a student I have no option but to persevere with it.

A shame really, because the concept of Nismotronic is brilliant - (semi) affordable tuning platform for home enthusiasts to "have a go" without spending too much. A shame that it doesn't just work as it should, I guess you get that when it's just pretty much one guy maintaining the software as a hobby.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: N14_NEO on 05 April, 2016, 10:32:07 AM
A shame really, because the concept of Nismotronic is brilliant - (semi) affordable tuning platform for home enthusiasts to "have a go" without spending too much. A shame that it doesn't just work as it should, I guess you get that when it's just pretty much one guy maintaining the software as a hobby.

Fair point - it is a great idea. I think anybody would have a really tough time trying to break into the ECU market, and Nismotronic haven't done that bad a job considering they offer one product only for a handful of engines. To my understanding, it's more than a hobby for John?

Would have needed car tuned first... Catch-22  ::)

Misplaced; not necessarily for everyone. The majority of builds in this club have been replicated by someone who Darryl has tuned for - therefore giving him a fair idea of what "safe" tune he can send you if you do need to travel.

This is probably a good time to mention that more than 50% of club members are from Auckland (and probably another 20% in close surrounding areas). Given this, both the OP and mrt were odds-on to be in Darryl's area. Turns out mrt is most like from the more southern island, and Gherkin is from Auckland.

This is, also, probably a good time to mention that I'm a massive fan of Link ECUs. However, given most members we haven't heard much from are unlikely to spend the extra money on a Link, they should be made aware of what the SR20 specific community has to offer.

-Install Link G4 for easy tuning by literally anyone who knows what they are doing

I have massive support and appreciation for the fact that most decent tuning shops will tune a Link - it should be single-handedly the deciding factor for buying an ECU. However, your tune at Manfeild didn't seem to be stable at all, so I can't see any obvious benefits here (yet..), just a decent outlay of cash.

-Take car to professional tuning shop to get the job done on a dyno

See above point.

-Custom engine loom wiring (rather than getting a new loom and modifying slightly to suit). Not really that hard because I find wiring to be the easiest part.

But most people find wiring an engine into a car really difficult, as well as being absolutely critical to be correct - note, this isn't required with Nemu boards nor the cheaper standard "daughterboard" (which I would recommend for a car that will likely have the same set up over time - ie. won't require a lot of tinkering or re-tuning).

Your solution is not the only solution, but, to me, it was, merely, the solution that was sold to you. I think it is more important to give information in the form of broad options, rather than to quip that one should "go down to your local tuning shop and open your wallet". If nothing else, winding you up has gotten you to list some points (that I agree with) to back your quip up. Good discussion, and one that I give a lot of merit given your experience with Nemus and Links.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 05 April, 2016, 10:55:23 AM
your tune at Manfeild didn't seem to be stable at all, so I can't see any obvious benefits here (yet..), just a decent outlay of cash.

Tell me about it - that's because the particular tuner I chose happened to come down with serious knee problems for his clutch foot and hence be away from work and unable to finish my tune - not exactly something I could foresee when choosing a tuner.

This is probably a good time to mention that more than 50% of club members are from Auckland (and probably another 20% in close surrounding areas). Given this, both the OP and mrt were odds-on to be in Darryl's area. Turns out mrt is most like from the more southern island, and Gherkin is from Auckland.

I looked back through his previous posts and found he was previously looking for something in the south island  :P

it was, merely, the solution that was sold to you.

I didn't talk to anyone who got commission for my purchase of the Link, nor did I ever plan to buy the link from the people who convinced me that it was the correct solution for what I wanted.

If nothing else, winding you up has gotten you to list some points (that I agree with) to back your quip up. Good discussion, and one that I give a lot of merit given your experience with Nemus and Links.

I appreciate your appreciation :)
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: Hungry on 05 April, 2016, 02:22:32 PM
From my experience with Nismotronic - Excellent ECU, very well priced considering the amount of features etc, The software is very easy to use, there are a limited number of people who will tune it. The only issues i ever had 1: The tune just "dropped" off it and only had a start up tune on it. I reloaded the tune from the computer and all was back to going good. 2: It apparently stopped switching one of the VVL Solenoids - it was working before i took it to the tuner so either it died at a really bad time or the tuner could not figure out how to get it working. (Or they shafted me so i would buy a link).


From my experience with Link: Top level ECU, Prices vary on the model but i got the basic one so also relatively cheap,  Has plenty of functions, no issues with the ECU.

3 reasons i bought a Link, 1 - my car was stuck at the tuners half completed so i kind of needed it. 2 - It meant i had a brand new computer (not a 20 year old ECU) 3 - Anybody decent will tune it
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 05 April, 2016, 03:58:38 PM
From my experience with Nismotronic - Excellent ECU, very well priced considering the amount of features etc, The software is very easy to use, there are a limited number of people who will tune it. The only issues i ever had 1: The tune just "dropped" off it and only had a start up tune on it. I reloaded the tune from the computer and all was back to going good. 2: It apparently stopped switching one of the VVL Solenoids - it was working before i took it to the tuner so either it died at a really bad time or the tuner could not figure out how to get it working. (Or they shafted me so i would buy a link).


From my experience with Link: Top level ECU, Prices vary on the model but i got the basic one so also relatively cheap,  Has plenty of functions, no issues with the ECU.

3 reasons i bought a Link, 1 - my car was stuck at the tuners half completed so i kind of needed it. 2 - It meant i had a brand new computer (not a 20 year old ECU) 3 - Anybody decent will tune it

100% agree with Wade. However the Link Atom is severely retarded if you have anything other than a stripped out track weapon like Wade's car. Even the Storm Blue Edition (my one) only has 4 Digital inputs, which is reduced to 3 if you use the knock control (like I did). So speed sensor, neutral switch, and start signal take all my digital inputs up. So no opportunity for boost switch, fuel map switch (one for muffler open, one for closed. Not that this is really necessary), a "start data log" switch, a "custom" security system/electronic killswitch, or anything else cool :(  Or you could but the extreme, if you're a baller...

This issue is fixed with the new Storm Black edition, which has 8 digital inputs. The only trade off is that the internal MAP is removed. You just need to run the external MAP sensor with it, a small price to pay for 4 extra digital inputs.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: morrisman1 on 05 April, 2016, 08:42:16 PM
My experiences with the nismotronic:

Awesome features for what it costs and retains the stock functions of a stock computer. Software is still being improved over time. Very capable drop in ECU requiring virtually zero wiring.

Downsides of it: you kind of have to learn to tune it yourself. I don't mind that as thats what I want to do anyway but that could be an issue for some people. The place Im going to get a proper tune fortunately is open minded and we are going to work together with me mainly operating the ECU while he tells what changes he wants.

I have had it corrupt a tune file a couple times after uploading. Unsure why but closing the software, then reopening and re-uploading the tune fixes it. Seems to only happen immediately after a new tune being uploaded.

It also only has 4 analogue inputs and a couple digital inputs, but this is made up for by the fact that many of the data inputs you would use on a link have their dedicated inputs on the nismotronic, for example start signal, knock sensor etc so currently out of my available inputs Im only using one for wideband o2 sensor.

In the end, a lot of the functions of an expensive ECU are moot on our engines as they advertise functions like knock control that my dirty 25 year old p10 ECU can operate with the nismotronic. Things like VCT control are of no value on an SR20.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: pTen Developments on 06 April, 2016, 06:00:17 AM
Funny,the 'high end' tuners around auckland i spoke to were keen to tune the nismotronics and were very interested learning more because of how advanced the chip is.

Other people who have had issues with tuners not wanting to tune them end up buying an ECU off them for a tune, seems like these tuners only want to tune their ecus for extra profit?

I see the only downfall with Nismotronics is the need of an older ecu, but these are still quite plenty-full, if you know what you are doing the right choice of ecu will net you a couple of bonus in/outputs. EG, S13 DET for 4 ignition outputs, or a US/AUDM ecu for the EGR

Link isn't a bad ecu, but i have yet to see anyone get decent "gains" from switching from a basic piggy back daughterboard to a link in the club. You may have more advanced tuning maps and more tuning features but are these actually needed for our cars? and the end product would still be the same.

The OP might be happy with a basic, US/AUDM ecu with eprom board which is normally more than enough for most people.

Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 06 April, 2016, 11:45:50 AM
All I can say is: once you go Link, you won't go back. :)

How do tuners get more profit from tuning a Link ECU? If anything it would take longer to tune a Nismotronic, and hence they could charge more for labour and make more profit that way.

Don't bag on Link ECUs unless you've owned one. Fiddling with someone else's for 5 minutes doesn't count. A Nismotronic is by far not the "same thing" as a Link or give the "same end product".

Brendan especially you: I would be dubious to use an economy-spec ECU with your engine you've spent $30,000 building. One corrupted tune during a full load pull and the engine's toast - all to save a mere $1500 on a cheaper ECU. May as well have used a DSR turbo and Chinese stainless manifold.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: pTen Developments on 06 April, 2016, 04:03:54 PM
I have owned a link ECU before, and have dealt with them loads of times with customers cars and im not bashing link.

Because they will charge you retail for a Link ecu which they get a decent discount (I know cause im a link dealer) and then they will charge you to wire/setup and then obviously tune it.

I am not using a Nismotronic purely because of the cost... as you know from my build I didn't cut corners due to money.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: more_fasterer on 06 April, 2016, 10:03:53 PM
Link isn't a bad ecu, but i have yet to see anyone get decent "gains" from switching from a basic piggy back daughterboard to a link in the club. You may have more advanced tuning maps and more tuning features but are these actually needed for our cars? and the end product would still be the same.

Are you comparing ECU's based on power output?
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: pTen Developments on 07 April, 2016, 03:17:28 AM
Link isn't a bad ecu, but i have yet to see anyone get decent "gains" from switching from a basic piggy back daughterboard to a link in the club. You may have more advanced tuning maps and more tuning features but are these actually needed for our cars? and the end product would still be the same.

Are you comparing ECU's based on power output?

Not at all
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 07 April, 2016, 11:04:00 AM
Are you comparing ECU's based on power output?

Actually, funnily enough you probably would have the potential to make slightly more power on the Link. The NEMU doesn't have real-time barometric compensation (only once at startup), so overall your tune would have to be slightly safer.... probably like half a kilowatt difference though haha
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: pTen Developments on 07 April, 2016, 11:49:23 AM
Are you comparing ECU's based on power output?

Actually, funnily enough you probably would have the potential to make slightly more power on the Link. The NEMU doesn't have real-time barometric compensation (only once at startup), so overall your tune would have to be slightly safer.... probably like half a kilowatt difference though haha
Thats more than enough to swing most people lol
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: morrisman1 on 07 April, 2016, 08:45:25 PM
MAF would provide your barometric correction anyway wouldn't it? Less dense air means less heat extracted from wire and lower reading. Or are you referring to when you use MAP metering?

A thing I have never understood about barometric correction is why do we need to have it, why not just read manifold pressure in absolute pressure, wouldn't that provide all the barometric correction that is needed? Or does the exhaust side pressure create that much of a difference in volumetric efficiency?

Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 08 April, 2016, 09:14:52 AM
MAF would provide your barometric correction anyway wouldn't it? Less dense air means less heat extracted from wire and lower reading. Or are you referring to when you use MAP metering?

Yes, sorry I should've been more clear. I'm referring to when you use MAP metering. MAF metering is fine and has inherent barometric compensation built-in, but professional tuners are "less keen" and less experienced to do MAF jobs, because most people just use a Link or something.

A thing I have never understood about barometric correction is why do we need to have it, why not just read manifold pressure in absolute pressure, wouldn't that provide all the barometric correction that is needed? Or does the exhaust side pressure create that much of a difference in volumetric efficiency?

Ahhh Ha! I wondered this for a while, then I did a whole lot of reading on the internet and figured out that engines are a lot more complicated in that regard than they first appear.

The thing with volumetic efficiency is that one of it's primary influences is throttle position.

More important to understand is why your fuel table should be traversed by RPM and MGP (i.e. in the Link G4), rather than RPM and MAP (as in the NEMU). The requirement for barometric compensation lies in the need to know MGP - the difference between manifold pressure and barometric pressure. The reason for this can be explained by way of an example. Let's also assume a Normally Aspirated car.

Say you're at sea level, 100kPa barometric pressure. At WOT you also have roughly 100kPa in the intake manifold. This corresponds to 0kPa MGP (gauge pressure), and you tune to suit. For example, you tune to 12.5:1 AFR.

Then you close the throttle a little bit, and the pressure in the intake goes down to 75kPa. the barometric pressure remains at 100kPa. The gauge pressure (MGP) is now -25kPa (ie. 25kPa of vacuum). You then tune to suit, say for example 12.5:1 AFR for simplicity.

The key thing here is that volumetric efficiency has gone way down with the slight closing of the throttle. So you need way less fuel to obtain that 12.5:1 AFR reading.

Now, the tune is finished and you drive to the top of a mountain. The barometric pressure is now 75kPa. You put your foot to the floor, what happens? the manifold pressure goes to 75kPa. What's your MGP? That's right, it's still 0kPa, like the sea level example.

Now, because the throttle is wide open, you have maximum volumetric efficiency. Thus, you need proportionally the same amount of fuel as the 100kPa cell from the seal level example, but scaled by 75% (to account for the fact there is less air). This is where it is key to note the difference between "traversing the fuel map" and "the value used in the fuel equation" - two separate things.

However, if you are traversing the fuel map as you would be on the NEMU (i.e. by MAP, rather than MGP), you will be in the 75kPa cell, which was tuned with the throttle slightly closed and hence with a much lower volumetric efficiency (75kPa is also used in the fuel equation, as well as to traverse the fuel map). So your injector pulse width is much narrower...... oh snap! you're miles too lean and just melted a piston!

Now take the Link G4. You are traversing the fuel map based on MGP, so you are in the 0kPa MGP cell (and remember barometric pressure is 75kPa), which translates to the 100kPa MAP cell at sea level. However the Value used in the fuel equation is the barometric pressure, 75kPa. So you're approximately bang on for your volumetric efficiency and fuel requirements - you get the "maximum volumetric efficiency cell" (0kPa MGP), but with less air going into the engine overall (75kPa MAP instead of 100kPa MAP).

I've used kPa in all these examples, but the same applies with psi (which I actually prefer to think about in turbo situations).

Remember the volumetric efficiency changes bugger all with altitude. Is does a little bit, but not much.

In simple words, you do not want the car to step down the fuel map with changes in manifold pressure - you want the car to step down the fuel map with changes in differential pressure with the outside world. This is because the Y axis on your fuel table is not for pressure - it is for volumetric efficiency. The amount of air is only relevant in the fuel equation, not the fuel table.

This also relates back to what you said about exhaust back pressure - if differential pressure between the atmosphere and intake manifold is equal, then exhaust back pressure will be pretty close (ignoring the fact that the amount of fuel burning causes massive changes in the cylinder pressures as the exhaust valves open. Hopefully the ignition timing is tuned properly to avoid this becoming an issue as you head up a mountain)

This is why you would have to tune very safely for MAP on the NEMU, or stick with MAF.

To the contrary, ignition timing is the opposite. When you drive up the mountain in the example above, you are getting less air and less fuel overall, so your burn speed is lower. Thus, stepping down the ignition map (and hence advancing the timing) with MAP is a good thing, and is a better way to do it than stepping down with MGP! This is why the Link G4 software's default settings are:
->MGP as the Y axis on the fuel table (and RPM as X axis). MAP used in fuel equation.
->MAP on the Y axis for the ignition table (and RPM as X axis)

Of course for NA cars, you often get unstable intake manifold pressures - especially when using gargantuan X-Force intakes (or whatever they are called) and high-overlap cams. In this scenario, tuners will often tune using TPS as the Y axis of the fuel table, and barometric pressure as the value in the fuel equation. Wade's car is such an example of this :)
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: Brandon on 08 April, 2016, 11:59:52 PM
I like how this thread has gotten carried away

I dont think either ecu offers any benefit in getting a power figure, at the end of the day, both perform the same task, one just has more features than the other.

Link is fantastic, and heavily reputable, in NZ.
Overseas it is still somewhat behind the likes of Motec or Haltech (or so ive heard) but I believe the latest edition is starting to catch up.

Also, just prospecting here, im not sure barometric pressure has as much of an impact here as in other countries. Our country is exceptionally flat really (in altitude), and we dont have vast swings in weather where we go from 45 degrees to -45 degrees.

I completely understand the points of a 20 year old unit vs new, but hardly see this as a reason to avoid an old ecu. cant say i have ever worked on a p10 and found that the ecu had miraculously died.
Whereas i have had lots of new electrical components fail.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: Brandon on 09 April, 2016, 12:05:07 AM
also i had my NEMU tuned by Brent at Dynopower in tauranga.
took him all of 5 minutes to figure it out, only issue he had was figuring which keys were quick keys for saving and uploading.

If a tuning shop turns down tuning the NEMU, NEWSFLASH, its a ploy to make you buy their product *cough* LINK.

It is stupidly simple to use especially for a professional tuner
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: pTen Developments on 09 April, 2016, 05:55:42 AM
also i had my NEMU tuned by Brent at Dynopower in tauranga.
took him all of 5 minutes to figure it out, only issue he had was figuring which keys were quick keys for saving and uploading.

If a tuning shop turns down tuning the NEMU, NEWSFLASH, its a ploy to make you buy their product *cough* LINK.

It is stupidly simple to use especially for a professional tuner

Bang on the money.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: morrisman1 on 09 April, 2016, 09:26:28 AM
Great post Lance, that fully explains it. I hadn't considered that a change in manifold pressure through closing the throttle would have a different impact to a change in manifold pressure through different ambient conditions.

Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 10 April, 2016, 09:28:14 AM
Great post Lance, that fully explains it. I hadn't considered that a change in manifold pressure through closing the throttle would have a different impact to a change in manifold pressure through different ambient conditions.

Cheers!

If a tuning shop turns down tuning the NEMU, NEWSFLASH, its a ploy to make you buy their product *cough* LINK.

Still waiting to hear how you consider Link to be the tuning shop's product :P
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: pTen Developments on 10 April, 2016, 09:35:44 AM
If a tuning shop turns down tuning the NEMU, NEWSFLASH, its a ploy to make you buy their product *cough* LINK.

Still waiting to hear how you consider Link to be the tuning shop's product :P
[/quote]

Product as in something they sell, they get a decent cut out of the sale.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: Brandon on 10 April, 2016, 10:01:42 AM
I think Lance is meaning that he didn't buy his link from the tuner he went to.

But I was more just making a point that a tuner would do that to try and get a sale.

Also Lance, didn't troy (your tuner) tell you to get a link, it was was only his bad luck that you bought elsewhere and he didn't get the sale? Haha

Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 10 April, 2016, 05:44:38 PM
It was was only his bad luck that you bought elsewhere and he didn't get the sale? Haha

Straight up told him I wasn't gonna buy it off him, and of my intentions to wire it in myself. Lifetime manufacturer's warranty + commodity product with little configuration required means you can buy it from anywhere (i.e. the absolute cheapest) and get exactly the same product and support.

Also, just prospecting here, im not sure barometric pressure has as much of an impact here as in other countries. Our country is exceptionally flat really (in altitude), and we dont have vast swings in weather where we go from 45 degrees to -45 degrees.

When you drive from Wellington up to the carpark at the top of Mt. Ruapehu, you climp to an altitude of 0m to 1600m above sea level. at 1600m, the barometric pressure is about 85kPa, or 85% of pressure at sea level. To me, that's a decent change in pressure, and not exactly "flat".
>inb4 "how many times are you gonna drive to Mt Ruapehu"

Anyway that argument isn't very important since you would likely tune off MAF with the NEMU :)
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: Hungry on 12 April, 2016, 06:23:10 PM
A side note:

STMs tuner (Chris), who is a very reputable tuner that i would highly recommend, is leaving within a month or so. So all the tuners who helped STM build their  good reputation have left or are leaving. So before you go to them - figure out who will be tuning your car as they have not found another one yet.

He will be tuning in Tauranga in the future.  - So for you guys up the top half of the island, you will have another good option for tuning.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: My real name is Lance on 12 April, 2016, 10:42:51 PM
STMs tuner (Chris), who is a very reputable tuner that i would highly recommend, is leaving within a month or so. So all the tuners who helped STM build their  good reputation have left or are leaving. So before you go to them - figure out who will be tuning your car as they have not found another one yet.

:(

I guess that's why STM just posted an ad saying they're hiring a new tuner and a new technician.

Still, they've got a reputation to uphold. Almost like a self fulfilling prophecy in the sense that starting with a good reputation can't be any worse than starting with no reputation at all.
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: Hungry on 13 April, 2016, 09:20:41 PM
I believe there is a common reason for the guys to be leaving, but i will leave it at that.

Chris should be doing a touch up on my car before he leaves ( i hope!)
Title: Re: Car tuning
Post by: gtircrazy on 27 April, 2016, 04:21:47 PM
Personally i have had experience with Motec, Link and a lot of daughter board ECU's.

Motec ECU was a pain... everything costs, you have to pay to unlock features and then pay more... or did i mention pay more? Other ECU manufactures have caught up though thank goodness, so i would now look else were. Helltech are looking good at the moment.

The Link G4 is ok, i have one fitted in one of my Gti-rs at the moment, packed with features and the fact you can buy a plug and play kit makes this such a sweet option, next to no wiring required. everyone knows how to tune them as well.

Daughter boards, well personally i think there great, so cheap and you can get just about any early 90's nissan set up to work just as well on them as you can with an aftermarket unit.  I've had Paul (alien probe) tune all my cars over the last 12 years!! He's never done me wrong. He currently has a 2wd dyno which soon will be based out of Pokeno inbetween auckland and Hamilton. We've seen great results over the years from all my cars he has tuned which have ranged in make and model.

People can debate on different ecu's/software ect but at the end of the day it all comes down to the tuner, and there knowledge has to expand further than just software and getting the timing maps and fuel mixtures correct. Often no matter how tu-meke flash you think you are as a home mechanic there are issues with the cars which have to be resolved before the tuning can even begin.